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Shutterstock.com (glitter); Whitney Curtis/AP Images for Scholastic, Inc (Jordan Reeves)
I Invented My New Arm

Jordan Reeves turned her disability into a superpower. Now she helps others do the same.

By Tricia Culligan
From the September 2019 Issue
Lexiles: 500L-600L, 600L-700L
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Jordan, age 13, was born with a disability. Her left arm stops above her elbow. But she says this difference doesn’t hold her back. She’s proud of being different. And she’s found a creative way to help other kids feel proud of their differences too.

Jordan, age 13, was born with a disability. Her left arm stops above the elbow. But she says this difference doesn’t hold her back. She’s proud of being different. And she’s found a creative way to help other kids feel proud of their differences too. 

Glitter Girl

Whitney Curtis/AP Images for Scholastic, Inc

Life isn’t always easy for Jordan. People sometimes stare at her. And Jordan can find it challenging to do certain activities. She sometimes uses a prosthetic arm to do things like ride a bike. 

Three years ago, Jordan designed a new prosthetic arm—one that turned her disability into a “superpower.” She worked with experts to create an arm that is shaped like a unicorn horn—and shoots glitter!

The team made the arm using a 3-D printer. That’s a printer that makes objects using plastic or other materials. Jordan called her invention Project Unicorn.

“It was a cool experience to show that you can build onto your difference to make it awesome,” she says.

Life isn’t always easy for Jordan. People sometimes stare at her. And Jordan can find it hard to do some activities. She sometimes uses a prosthetic arm to do things like ride a bike.

Three years ago, Jordan designed a new prosthetic arm. Her new arm turned her disability into a “superpower.” She worked with experts to create the arm. This arm is shaped like a unicorn horn and shoots glitter!

The team made the arm using a 3-D printer. That’s a printer that makes objects using plastic or other materials. Jordan called her invention Project Unicorn.

“It was cool to show that you can build onto your difference to make it awesome,” she says. 

Born Just Right

Jordan wanted other kids to have the same chance. She and her mom formed a group called Born Just Right to help kids create their own special prosthetic limbs.

People still stare at Jordan. But she uses those moments to teach others. And she has a message for any kid who feels different.

“Your differences are amazing!” says Jordan. 

 Jordan wanted other kids to have the same chance she had. She and her mom formed a group called Born Just Right to help kids create their own special prosthetic limbs.

People still stare at Jordan. But she uses those moments to teach others. And she has a message for any kid who feels different.

“Your differences are amazing!” says Jordan. 

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Can't Miss Teaching Extras
Watch This

Want to show your students how Jordan’s Project Unicorn prosthetic arm actually works? Show them this one-minute demonstration from Jordan herself. 

Watch This

Get to know Jordan in this 3 ½-minute TODAY Show profile. You can also ask your students: Does anyone know someone who has a prosthetic limb?

Check It Out

Jordan’s organization, Born Just Right, is always looking for creative kids to volunteer their design talents. If your students are makers-in-the-making, encourage them to step up!

From the Storyworks Jr. Archives

Share these paired texts about Charlie, an amazing kid whose talents are way more interesting than his differences.

Check It Out

The organization “Don’t Hide It, Flaunt It” celebrates the visible and invisible differences that make every child unique—whether it’s having curly hair, being adopted, having only a few fingers and toes. Share these personal and moving essays from kids; they’ll make perfect mentor texts.